Session 1H: Striking a Balance: A Culturally Compassionate Look at Corporal Punishment and How We End It

Track: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion 

Corporal punishment has been decreasing annually in the United States; however, the African American community continues to practice corporal punishment at higher rates than other ethnic groups, and Black children are disproportionately suffering the deleterious effects of “whupping.” This multidisciplinary presentation offers an overview of the complex psychological, physical, emotional, and educational effects of corporal punishment on the African American community and its ties to racism, criminal justice, and poor health outcomes. Participants will explore alternative discipline strategies and resources tailored to Black communities and families, perceived barriers to decreasing rates of corporal punishment in Black families, and hopes to highlight personal experiences audience members may have encountered during their work in child maltreatment toward efficacy discussing the topics of corporal punishment, equity, and cultural compassion. 

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Session 1H: Striking a Balance: A Culturally Compassionate Look at Corporal Punishment and How We End It
06/06/2022 at 8:00 AM (EDT)   |  60 minutes
06/06/2022 at 8:00 AM (EDT)   |  60 minutes Corporal punishment has been decreasing annually in the United States; however, the African American community continues to practice corporal punishment at higher rates than other ethnic groups, and Black children are disproportionately suffering the deleterious effects of “whupping.” This multidisciplinary presentation offers an overview of the complex psychological, physical, emotional, and educational effects of corporal punishment on the African American community and its ties to racism, criminal justice, and poor health outcomes. Participants will explore alternative discipline strategies and resources tailored to Black communities and families, perceived barriers to decreasing rates of corporal punishment in Black families, and hopes to highlight personal experiences audience members may have encountered during their work in child maltreatment toward efficacy discussing the topics of corporal punishment, equity, and cultural compassion.
Workshop Evaluation - Session 1H: Striking a Balance: A Culturally Compassionate Look at Corporal Punishment and How We End It
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Andrea Sebastian, DNP, SANE

DNP

University of Tennessee Le Bonheur

Lauren Burge, MD

Child Abuse Pediatrician, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Pediatrics

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Lauren Burge, MD, is a Child Abuse Pediatrician and Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. She is a member of the CARES team at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and completes medical evaluations of children with concerns of abuse or neglect. She graduated medical school at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and completed her pediatric residency at the University of Oklahoma. She also completed a 3-year fellowship in Child Abuse Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. After residency, Dr. Burge served as Chief Resident and served 2 years as a general pediatrician working with foster children and their families. Her interests in the filed include community outreach with an emphasis on education and the prevention of child abuse. Dr. Burge has authored multiple publications and has participated in numerous presentations on topics such as the recognition and reporting of child maltreatment and adverse childhood experiences.

Jasmyne Nelson, LMSW

LMSW, CARES Team, LeBonheur Children's Hospital

LeBonheur Children's Hospital

Jasmyne Nelson, LMSW is a licensed master social worker with over five years of experience working with diverse client and patient populations. She received her Master of Social Work from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. She has experience in child and family therapy, group facilitation, crisis management, medical social work, and advocacy. She has a passion for serving children and families, especially those facing complex emotional, generational, and societal traumas.

Karen Lakin, MD

Child Abuse Pediatrician, Assistant Professor, Dept of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Karen Lakin, MD, MSPH, FAAP is the Medical Director and founder of the Le Bonheur Child Advocacy Resource and Evaluation Services (CARES) Team at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, TN. Dr. Lakin received her undergraduate degree at Duke University and a Master’s in Public Health from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She received her medical degree at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC. After working in private practice, she began an Academic General Pediatric career with an emphasis in Child Maltreatment at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. She is board certified but the American Board of Pediatrics in General Pediatrics and Child Abuse Pediatrics. Dr. Lakin provides patient care and education in the field of Child Maltreatment and also provides assistance for investigations and legal expert witness testimony for cases involving child abuse.