Child Sexual Exploitation Resource Toolkit 

This toolkit represents the collected resources of the Children's Advocacy Center (CAC) movement to respond to the complex needs of Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (CSEC). Thanks to NCA's CSEC Collaborative Work Group (CSEC CWG) for their efforts to collect resources across the field and create new content especially for CACs in addressing the needs of these victims. 

Please contact Nicole Wilbon and the CSEC CWG if you have a resource to add to the toolkit at nwilbon@nca-online.org or by sending her a private message through NCA Engage. 

Related content: Child Sexual Abuse Material (Child Pornography) Resource Toolkit

Online Training Resources

Additional Resources 

CAC Response to Child Sex Trafficking

Description 

  • CAC Census Data related to CSEC (NCA)
    It is important to recognize the differences among each type of CSEC—it has crucial implications for the CAC response. The general term “trafficking” does not accurately describe all types of exploitation. However, for the purposes of this report, we looked strictly at CSEC cases involving child sex trafficking.
  • Child Trafficking: Adapting NCA Protocols (Maryland Children's Alliance)
    Maryland Children’s Alliance (referred to as MCA), in partnership with the Governor’s Office of Crime Control and Prevention (referred to as GOCCP) and the Department of Human Services (referred to as DHS), has adapted the National Standards for Accredited Members authored by National Children’s Alliance (referred to as NCA) to help local CACs and their multidisciplinary team partners meet the unique needs of, and circumstances around, child trafficking victims and cases.
  • Responding to Commercially Sexually Exploited and Trafficked Youth (NY State Office of Children and Family Services)
    The OCFS Responding to Commercially Sexually Exploited Youth: A Blueprint for systems of care in New York State (Blueprint) represents the accomplishments and lessons learned with these partner counties and includes emerging promising practices from the field. It is intended to serve as a road map for Local Departments of Social Services (LDSS) to respond to the needs of trafficked and sexually exploited youth in their localities. This document outlines the steps to identifying a “critical team,” developing a training plan for county and partner agency staff, adopting standardized identification tools, and provides tips for conducting youth outreach and public awareness campaigns.

Fact Sheets

Description 

  • Child Sex Trafficking in America: A Guide for Parents & Guardians (NCMEC)
    A guide for parents and guardians.
  • Child Sex Trafficking in America: A Guide for Child Welfare Professionals (NCMEC)
    A guide for child welfare professionals.
  • Child Sex Trafficking Guide for Parents & Guardians (NCMEC)
    A child sex trafficking guide for parents and guardians.

Identification & Investigation Tools

  • Human Trafficking Screening Tool: Administration Guide
    This guide is designed to help child welfare and delinquency professionals screen for possible youth victims of human trafficking. The tool, in its entirety, should be used by the Department of Children and Families’ Child Protective Investigators, the Sheriff’s Offices Child Protective Investigators and Community-Based Care Lead Agency staff or their contracted providers as outlined below. Human trafficking may be suspected for a number of reasons.
  • Child Protective Services and Risk Assessment: Human Trafficking Screening Tools (National Children's Advocacy Center)
    NCAC Child Protective Services and Risk Assessment: Human Trafficking Screening Tools
  • Child Sex Trafficking Identification Resource (NCMEC)
    National Center for Missing and Exploited Children Child Sex Trafficking Identification Resource. Some indicators to help law enforcement and other child-serving professionals determine if a child may be at-risk or is currently being recruited or exploited through possible child sex trafficking. While no single indicator confirms the existence of child sex trafficking, several indicators combined can increase the likelihood that a child is being exploited or is actively being targeted and recruited.

Protocol Development

  • Rhode Island Uniform Response Protocol for CSEC - One Page
    The commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) is a growing problem in Rhode Island and New England. It is, in a sense, a form of modern-day slavery involving the sexual abuse and exploitation of children for financial gain. In response, local, state and federal law enforcement agencies have partnered with Day One, the Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF), the Aubin Center at Hasbro Children’s Hospital, the Rhode Island Attorney General’s Office (RIAG), the United States Attorney’s Office (USAO), and other social service organizations in an effort to develop a multi-disciplinary approach to the problem.
  • Rhode Island Uniform Response Protocol for CSEC - Full Version
    The commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) is a growing problem in Rhode Island and New England. It is, in a sense, a form of modern-day slavery involving the sexual abuse and exploitation of children for financial gain. In response, local, state and federal law enforcement agencies have partnered with Day One, the Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF), the Aubin Center at Hasbro Children’s Hospital, the Rhode Island Attorney General’s Office (RIAG), the United States Attorney’s Office (USAO), and other social service organizations in an effort to develop a multi-disciplinary approach to the problem. This Protocol is intended to serve as a guide and resource to victim advocates, social service providers, healthcare providers, law enforcement, and prosecutors on how to detect and investigate human trafficking, successfully prosecute the crimes, and address the recovery needs of the victim.

Research

  • Child Sex Trafficking and Commercial Sexual Exploitation: Health Care Needs of Victims (American Academy of Pediatrics)
    Despite large numbers of American and foreign youth affected and a plethora of serious physical and mental health problems associated with CSEC, there is limited information available to pediatricians regarding the nature and scope of human trafficking and how pediatricians and other health care providers may help protect children. Knowledge of risk factors, recruitment practices, possible indicators of CSEC, and common medical and behavioral health problems experienced by victims will help pediatricians recognize potential victims and respond appropriately. As health care providers, educators, and leaders in child advocacy, pediatricians play an essential role in addressing the public health issues faced by child victims of CSEC.
  • Blueprint: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Domestic Sex Trafficking of Girls (Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality)
    This report grows out of a conference held on March 12, 2013, that was hosted by Georgetown Law’s Center on Poverty and Inequality; the Human Rights Project for Girls; and The National Crittenton Foundation. The conference, “Critical Connections: A Multi-Systems Approach to the Domestic Sex Trafficking of Girls,” gathered survivors, direct service providers, advocates, and state and federal government officials to discuss the challenges of addressing the domestic sex trafficking of children and the importance of working collaboratively to help identify and support survivors.
  • Building Child Welfare Response to Child Trafficking Handbook (Center for the Human Rights for Children, Loyola University Chicago)
    In 2007, the International Organization for Adolescents (IOFA), under the leadership of Katherine Kaufka Walts the then Executive Director, developed and launched the Building Child Welfare Response to Child Trafficking project. The purpose of this project is to build the capacity of child welfare agencies and service providers to identify and respond to this often invisible and underserved population. The primary goals are to ensure that children are correctly identified as trafficked persons and that they receive the appropriate protections and referrals to specialized services to which they are entitled under federal and state laws.

Survivor Care

Description

  • Book Flyer: Catch a Tiger by the Tail: Helping Non Offending Parents Find Their Inner Strength (Joddie Walker, MSc, RP, CTS)
    In 2012, Joddie Walker was faced with the most significant criminal investigation of her 25 years advocating for vulnerable victims. In a moment that would change the course of her career, Joddie discovered a crime and found herself in the centre of what would become an international investigation of child pornography and online solicitation of minors. The choice of advocating for child victims would cost her home, her community and her country.
  • Catch a Tiger by The Tail by J Walker
    Contact Info
  • Evidence-Based Mental Health Treatment for Victims of Human Trafficking (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)
    In 2008, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services published an issue brief, entitled Treating the Hidden Wounds: Trauma Treatment and Mental Health Recovery for Victims of Human Trafficking, which focused on the mental health needs of victims of human trafficking. This issue brief highlighted the impact of trauma on this population and the need for trauma-informed care. The same year, ASPE sponsored a National Symposium on the Health Needs of Human Trafficking Victims, which reiterated the complex health issues of this population and discussed the role of healthcare workers in addressing these needs.