Resources for CAC-Military Partnerships

Updated October 15, 2021

NCA has collected these resources, created by ourselves and our many expert partners, to help CACs build partnerships with local military installations and their leaderships to better serve military children and families.

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CAC-Military Partnership Webinar Series

NCA developed this webinar series for CACs and their military partners to expand their knowledge of the role each play in serving military children and families in responding to allegations of child abuse. Please see the product listing below. Users must be logged in to access trainings. 

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Status of CAC-Military Partnerships 2019

Children’s Advocacy Centers and the Military: Where We Are, and Where We’re Going Together

While some 900 Children’s Advocacy Centers in the United States coordinate the critical multidisciplinary services that child abuse victims need to heal, many children from military families experience barriers to receiving those services. Yet early successes in partnerships between CACs and military installation leadership can serve as a model to improve coordination and serve military families better.

We have a roadmap to ensure every military family has access to the services they deserve. Read Status of CAC-Military Partnerships 2019, NCA’s report to Congress on the needs NCA, CACs, Congress, and the military are working to meet together, plus highlights from critical pilot programs nationwide and the status of CAC partnerships with the military in all 50 states.

Status of CAC-Military Partnerships 2019
Access the report now


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Trauma and Resiliency in Military Families, a One in Ten Podcast Episode

When we think of military families, we rightly think of sacrifice and duty. But do we also think about resiliency, perseverance, and a sense of community? The unique sense of identity that comes with military service comes with a complex set of supports and struggles for service members. Dr. Stephen Cozza, a researcher and professor at the Uniformed Services University, joins us to explore the unique strengths and challenges of military families. What are the risks and protective factors that we should be aware of in working with military families? How does the phases of deployment and re-entry create some points of unique vulnerabilities that we need to attend to? And at a time when many soldiers are returning, how can we support families? We invited Dr. Stephen Cozza, a researcher and a professor at the Uniformed Services University, to speak with us about the unique strengths and challenges of military families. Take a listen.


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How Key Military Roles Support Children and Families in Child Abuse Response

Fact sheets for key roles in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy

To learn more about the military programs involved in child abuse response, see our fact sheets about the U.S. Air Force, the Army, the Marine Corps, and the Navy.

Air Force

How Key U.S. Air Force Roles Support Children and Families in Child Abuse Response
View this fact sheet

Army

How Key U.S. Army Roles Support Children and Families in Child Abuse Response
View this fact sheet

Marine Corps

How Key U.S. Marine Corps Roles Support Children and Families in Child Abuse Response
View this fact sheet


Navy

How Key U.S. Navy Roles Support Children and Families in Child Abuse Response
View this fact sheet